Car swallowed in Death Valley mud after flash flooding in California

After torrential downpours hit Death Valley this week, washing mud and debris through the basin, motorists were warned not to drive in the area — and here’s why.

A photo shared by Death Valley National Park on Facebook Monday showed a car swept off Highway 190, submerged in the mud.

A car submerged in debris after flash flooding hit Death Valley, California. Aug 1, 2022.

Death Valley National Park

“We urge people traveling in this area to use extreme caution, as storms are forecast to continue through Thursday,” park officials wrote. “If you see flowing water or debris, remember: turn around, don’t drown.”

The whereabouts of the motorist are unclear, but no injuries were reported.

The National Park Service has issued an extreme weather warning for the park, where current road closures include sections of Highway 190, Scotty’s Castle Road, Lower Wildrose Road, Dantes View and Badwater Road. There is currently no estimate on when the roads may reopen, with further rain forecast through Thursday.

The damaged intersection of Kelbacker Road and Mojave Road in the Mojave National Preserve, Calif., Sunday, July 31, 2022.

The damaged intersection of Kelbacker Road and Mojave Road in the Mojave National Preserve, Calif., Sunday, July 31, 2022.

National Park Service

Elsewhere in the region, flooding buckled pavement on roads and closed campgrounds in the Mojave National Preserve. Similar flash flooding has hit western Nevada and northern Arizona, reports the Associated Press. The National Weather Service reported over an inch of rainfall in just 15 minutes near Kingman, Arizona on Sunday.

In Southern California, mudslides in the San Bernardino National Forest sent trees and rocks onto the streets near Yucaipa, blocking the roads.

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