Melting ice figures echo climate crisis


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Néle Azevedo is globally known for “Minimum Monument,” a collection of small ice figures that melt in situ. The installation has found its way to cities like Paris, Belfast, Lima, and Porto. In each iteration, the artist carves hundreds of 20cm tall figures seated with their ankles crossed and places them atop outdoor steps and in public spaces.

Melting ice figures echo climate crisis

The faceless sculptures drip and pool into small puddles as time passes. With the intensifying climate crisis, the piece has become a literal reflection of global warming and the way life will soon disappear from the planet.

Melting ice figures echo climate crisis

A successor to “Minimum Monument,” Azevedo’s “Suspended State” similarly gathers more than 1,000 ice figures and dangles them over pots, bowls, and other kitchenware.

Vintage typewriters reassembled into metallic bird sculptures

Melting ice figures echo climate crisis

Jeremy Mayer challenges the notion that typewriters’ creative output is confined to the written word. The artist scours shops and trash bins near his studio for analog processors in disrepair that he then disassembles, sorts, and reconstructs into metallic sculptures. Mayer builds every piece solely from original parts rather than soldering or gluing, and some sculptures, including the black crow with a Corona-brand typewriter logo on its back, feature spring-like components that allow the creatures to bob their heads.

Vivid spectrums of color radiate from dichroic glass

Melting ice figures echo climate crisis

Dichroic glass produces a shifting spectrum of color depending on the viewpoint, emitting phenomenal prisms when illuminated. Often arranged on a panel or wall, the works evoke organic patterns, like helices. The installation by Chris Wood is an interpretation of how radiance, much like ideas and discoveries, start from one central point and expand outwards.

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